Refutations of ISIS

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AbuElyas
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Refutations of ISIS

Postby AbuElyas » Jul 27, 2016

As the problems from this group grow and cause more animosity against Muslims around the world, I thought it would be good to add some more discussion against them. The noise of general anti-islamic sentiment is drowning out the statements of people of knowledge would would refute them. The information below was an assignment paper I had written a few years ago regarding the Khawaarij and the linkage of their ideology to some of the modern groups:


When Abdullah ibn Abaas went to confront the Khawrij, he asked them what their grievances were with Ali (RA) and the sahabah with him. The Khawarij replied with 3 points: 1) Ali made men judges in matters that were only for Allah, 2) Ali fought his enemies (Muslims) and didn’t take booty, 3) Ali erased the title Ameer al Mumineen so he must be the opposite (Amir al Kafireen) (Jawzi, 1996, p. 25). These points, along with various ahadith of the Prophet (PBUH) show that in their extreme view points, they misinterpret and make serious errors. They are characterized by Takfir, outward piety, arrogance and youth (Bhutto, 2014). Throughout history groups with similar ideas have come and gone. In our times we see various groups that show similar ideologies to the initial sect. In this paper, I will focus on the Islamic State group (ISIS) due to their size, influence and prevalence at this current time.

In the first point that the Khawarij gave to ibn Abbas, one of the main slogans of this group is that “Judgment is only for Allah”. In the case of the early Khawarij, this statement was regarding their belief that Ali and Muwayyiah should battle to the death to see which group of Muslims came out on top. We see this again with ISIS in several forms. We see them considering all forms of man-made law, or ruling by other than what Allah revealed as proof of shirk (tawaghit rulers). They extend the allegation of shirk to anyone that follows a leader that does this, which leads them to declare apostasy of the masses ((IS), Dabiq #2 - The Flood, 2014, p. 10). The liberation of Mecca and Medina is a stated goal of this group ((IS), Dabiq #2 - The Flood, 2014, p. 3). They also threaten to kill any “apostate” in the way on the march towards Palestine ((IS), Dabiq #2 - The Flood, 2014, p. 4). Besides the rulers of countries, they have also gone to the extreme of calling other Islamic extremist groups apostates due to any support they might have had for democratically elected Islamic governments [ex: Morsi in Egypt] ((IS), Dabiq #1 - The Return of Khalifah, 2014, pp. 19-20). Like the Khawarij, their ideology is full of an “us” vs “them” mentality, where anyone that is not with ISIS is in the camp of the disbelievers. This point couldn’t be made any clearer than with the title of an article from their magazine which was called “It’s either the Islamic State or the flood” ((IS), Dabiq #2 - The Flood, 2014, p. 5).

In the third point that they presented to Ibn Abbas, they stated that if Ali didn’t address himself as Amir al Mumineen, then he must be Amir al Kafireen. In this point, there are some differences between ISIS and the original Khawarij, however the focus they place on leadership is very similar. Their requirement that the leader is from their sect (or view point) is a means which they use to break away from the main body of Muslims, as well as splinter amongst themselves. In the modern fragmented Islamic world, we have Islamic states and leaders of them, while we have two men and two pseudo states claiming to be Amir al Mumineen and the Islamic Caliphate. While other leaders may not claim the title of Amir al Mumineen, this doesn’t necessarily make the illegitimate Muslim rulers. In the media produced by ISIS they like to repeat the various hadiths related to bay’ah and the requirement of obeying the ruler. One of them is:

“Whoever dies without having bound himself by a bay’ah, dies a death of jahiliyyah” [Muslim] ((IS), Dabiq #2 - The Flood, 2014, p. 4)

Another that they mention is a hadith narrated by Abdur Rahman ibn Abd Rabbil Kabah which talks about tribulations towards the end of times, then ends by stating:

“Whoever pledge allegiance to an imam, giving him his hand in sincerity, should obey him as much as he is able to. And if another man comes forward disputing his legitimacy, then strike that other man’s neck” [Muslim] ((IS), Dabiq #1 - The Return of Khalifah, 2014, p. 15)

This above narration continues in a discussion, with those who heard the narration, talking about Mu’awiyah ordering sin and unjust killing. The one narrating the hadith stated “Obey him concerning what is obedience to Allah, and disobey him in matters involving disobedience to Allah”. The points that this raises in regards to ISIS help to further demonstrates how they live up to the title of Khawarij (seceders). Initially their groups was under Al Qaeda, which had pledge allegiance to another who had claimed to be Amir al Mumineen, yet they had no problems breaking away from this and another other leader that they were under due to citizenship or other pledges that they might have given. It also points out some hypocrisy in the earlier point regarding declaring sinful rulers as apostates, since this narration rejects disobeying them completely. Like the Khawarij, they have no problems switching allegiances for ideological disputes. One difference that can be seen is in the selection of their leader. They picked a person who is allegedly from the tribe of Quraysh in order to fulfill the hadiths related to Quraysh being the source of leadership, instead of taking the position that anyone could be the Imam.

The final similarity that should be raised is not from the 3 points given to ibn Abbas, instead it comes from the actions of the Khawarij related to what followed. Blood of Muslims was always cheap for this group and they exceeded the bounds in this, which can be seen in the example of death of Abdullah ibn Khabbaab (RA) and the murder of his wife and unborn child (Jawzi, 1996, p. 28). ISIS follows a similar path of making permissible the killing of anyone that they consider an enemy of Islam, or an apostate. This can be seen in their blanket statement of revenge in their magazine, which encourages their supporters to kill the citizens of any country that is in a coalition against the Islamic state. They say, don’t see a verdict or get advice, and it doesn’t matter if they are a non-combatant. If the enemy doesn’t differentiate between military and civilian, why should ISIS ((IS), Dabiq #4 - The Failed Crusade, 2014, p. 9). Where ISIS and the original Khawarij split is in the fact that the earlier Khawarij were not harsh against the non-Muslims, whereas ISIS is harsh with all. The way they interpret the verses of jihad is the same way that an anti-Muslim propagandist would interpret them.

Through these points, we can see that ISIS shares many similarities in ideology with the earlier Khawarij group. In others they exceed it. They pose the same threat to the Ummah as a whole compared to earlier groups, however due to the anger, ignorance and oppression amongst the Ummah today, they find more political support than earlier groups. Allah’s refuge is sought from the dangers of this misguidance and fitnah.

Bibliography
(IS), A. M. (2014, Ramadan). Dabiq #1 - The Return of Khalifah. Retrieved from archive.org: https://archive.org/details/HMC_DBQ1
(IS), A. M. (2014, Ramadan). Dabiq #2 - The Flood. Retrieved from archive.org: https://archive.org/details/HMC_DQB2
(IS), A. M. (2014, shawwal). Dabiq #3 - A call to hijrah. Retrieved from archive.org: https://archive.org/details/Dabiq03_en
(IS), A. M. (2014, Dhul-hijjah). Dabiq #4 - The failed Crusade. Retrieved from archive.org: https://archive.org/details/DabiqIssue4
(IS), A. M. (2014, Muharram). Dabiq #5 - Remaining and Expanding. Retrieved from archive.org: https://archive.org/details/DabiqIssue5_201411
Bhutto, N. (2014, Oct). Who are Khawarij. Retrieved from Darussalam Publishers: http://www.darussalampublishers.com/blo ... -khawarij/
Jawzi, I. (1996). The Devil's Deception (translation by Dr Bilal Philips). Al Hidaayah.
Philips, D. A. (n.d.). Mislamic Sects Part one. IOU.



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AbuElyas
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Re: Refutations of ISIS

Postby AbuElyas » Jul 27, 2016

A further point that I have been thinking over more recently in regards to their position of bay'ah and trying declare muslims apostates for not accepting their leader based on the hadith:

“Whoever dies without having bound himself by a bay’ah, dies a death of jahiliyyah” [Muslim 1851a, b, and c]

If they hold the position that anyone who refuses bay'ah to the legitimate leader is a disbeliever, I would ask about Abdullah ibn Umar (RA). He was among several who refused to give bay'ah to Yazid while Mu'awiyyah (RA) was still alive, believing that it was incorrect to give bay'ah to a successor while the current ruler was still alive. Later when the Ummayid's were falling apart and Abdullah ibn Az Zubayr (RA) was being given bay'ah by the vast majority of the ummah (including some of the Ummayid governors), he didn't give bay'ah again due to fitnah. So, would ISIS, in this case consider Abdullah ibn Umar (RA) to be a disbeliever for this later refusal? If so, do they take ahadith from an apostate (meaning the narrator of the above hadith)? Obviously since he narrated the hadith, he was aware of it and surely understood it better than anyone today. Surely we have more fitnah and divisions today, and Abdullah ibn Umar (RA) is above any critism in this regard.


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